Best Monitor under 150 Dollars (Reviews and Guide 2022)

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Best Monitor under 150

The most common budget for a new monitor is $150. Thankfully these days, that’s enough money to get a high-quality monitor. On the one hand, the $150 monitor is actually a crowded segment full of some great competition. But demand is high for 24-inch monitors with a 1080p resolution and a 60 to 70Hz refresh rate at this price. You’ll find a blend of useful features with the best panels possible competing with other well-known brands. All monitors on our list were chosen based on customer feedback, specifications and various resources to help you find the best monitor under 150 dollars.

IN A HURRY?  HERE ARE OUR TOP PICKS…

   SizePanel TypeResolution 
1.BenQ GW248024-inchIPSFull HDView
2.Sceptre E248W24-inchTNFull HDView
3.Acer SB220Q21.5-inch IPSFull HDView
4.Sceptre C248W24-inchVAFull HDView
5.Philips 276E9QDSB27-inch IPSFull HDView
6.Sceptre E205W20-inch VAHD+View
7.Acer R240HY24-inchIPS Full HDView

Best Monitor under 150 Dollars Reviews

1. BenQ GW2480 24-inch

BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black
  • 24 inch full HD 1080P IPS panel: 23. 8” full HD IPS widescreen with 1920x1080 resolution, 250 nits of brightness, built-in speakers
  • Wide viewing angle: 178° wide viewing angle for clarity from any viewing angle
  • Edge to edge slim bezel design: Ultra-slim bezel for virtually seamless multi-panel configurations for extended view, space-saving base, elegant design for home office
  • Patented Eye-Care for extended use: Proprietary brightness Intelligence Adaptive technology adjusts brightness for comfortable viewing, low blue light and zero-flicker technology prevent headaches and eye strain. This eye tech delivers optimized images that are easy on your eyes.
  • Integrated cable management system: neatly hides cables inside monitor stand; VESA wall mount: 100 x 100 (millimeter)

Last update on 2022-06-27 at 07:36 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

The BenQ GW2480 is our top choice for the best monitor under 150 dollars. It has a 1080p resolution and a bezel-free design to satisfy your everyday computing needs at home, school or in the office. And you can even do some casual gaming.

The 24-inch IPS panel is also equipped with a not so high refresh rate of 60Hz with a 5ms response time. The 1000:1 contrast ratio and 250 nits of backlight is modest and doesn’t offer much room for adjustment. But it’s more than sufficient for daily use with good picture quality.

There’s a pair of 1-watt speakers on the bottom corner for basic audio playback, which is unique for a monitor at this price.

Composed of modest proportions and minimal extras, the GW2480 follows the brand’s sleek aesthetic treatment. It’s finished in a matte black that should keep the device free from fingerprints.

The chassis feels sturdy and well-reinforced with no discernable defects (you have to apply a generous amount of force to see any signs of wobble). Which means the monitor won’t topple over as you type.

We wish the GW2480 were more ergonomic, though. While you get excellent stability for a budget monitor, adjustments are rather limited. Thankfully it’s compatible with 100×100 VESA mounts with bolting holes exposed in the rear panel.

As a budget monitor we didn’t expect a lot of convenience features. You get OSD (onscreen display) buttons instead of joysticks or remotes to adjust the screen. It’s easy to miss press things until you get used to the button layout.

All though the I/O panel is simple, you get all you need. Including a DisplayPort 1.2, HDMI 1.4 and VGA for video inputs. And a 3.5mm audio jack for audio passthrough.

Pros:

  • frameless design
  • impressive image quality
  • integrated speakers
  • good value for the price
  • low input lag
  • fast response time
  • many connectivity options
  • Innovative Brightness Intelligence technology

Cons:

  • no AMD FreeSync
  • tilt-only design

2. Sceptre E248W 24-inch

If you’re in the market for medium size display, the Sceptre E248W offers solid performance with thin bezels and a metallic design.

Built for everyday tasks like Web surfing, reading emails and watching videos. The E248W has a sleek, 24-inch screen with TN panel technology that delivers a sharp Full HD experience.

Along with an acceptable 5m (microsecond) G-to-G (gray-to-gray) response time. You’re also getting a 60Hz refresh rate and a 1,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, which is on par with most budget monitors. You get rich, well saturated colors. But while the gray-scale performance is good, it can’t match that of a high-end IPS panel.

Image quality is good but not the best with minimal color shifting when viewed from different angles. And all though it does a good job of rendering fast-moving action, there is a noticeable input lag of 12.8 milliseconds when playing modern games at high resolutions.

Its slim-bezel and silver metallic cabinet makes the monitor look good on any desktop. It’s a fresh change from the usual plastic in this category. The stand has a stabilized round shape that’s confidence inspiring. But it doesn’t allow for height or swivel adjustment. You can’t even pivot it for portrait mode viewing.

On the back are five small function buttons. The power switch is located near the right bezel. The on-screen menu offers a nice selection of picture settings (the Standard setting gives the best overall picture).

On the rear of the cabinet is where you’ll find a VGA port, two HDMI ports, a headphone jack and AC power jack.

Pros:

  • sleek, metallic design
  • good grayscale performance
  • FreeSync up to 60Hz
  • two HDMI ports
  • built-in speakers

Cons:

  • lacks advanced color settings
  • no swivel or height adjustment
  • limited connectivity
  • minor ghosting in fast-paced gaming (mostly in dark scenes)

3. Acer SB220Q 21.5-inch

If you’re looking for a smaller display, the Acer SB220Q is a compact 21.5-inch monitor built for general purpose that proves cheap doesn’t have to mean cheaply made.

The IPS display is amazingly thin with very good color accuracy in the sRGB space. You get an FHD resolution with a 16:9 widescreen aspect ratio. Rated at 178-degrees for vertical and horizontal, viewing angles are wide. But there is a bit of softening of colors when you view the monitor from the side.

It supports a pixel refresh of up to 75Hz over an HDMI connection. And there’s support for AMD’s FreeSync. It also offers to 240 nits of brightness and it has an impressive 1206:1 contrast ratio.

If you want a thin monitor for less than $150, this is the one to get. It’s narrow bezel on the top and sides help keep dimensions small for the screen size.

The stand is simple consisting of a circular base and vertical shaft that connects to the bottom of the monitor. Ergonomics are as basic as all monitors at this price range, meaning that you’re limited to tilt adjustment (5 degrees toward you and 15 degrees away from you).  

At the bottom right edge is the power button and five small buttons that control the OSD. There’s a wide range of settings that are easy to navigate.

Ports are limited to HDMI and VGA, which makes the monitor an excellent choice if you want to connect to an older computer that doesn’t support HDMI. And there’s a Kensington lock slot.

Pros:

  • elegant design
  • available three-year warranty
  • ultra-thin IPS panel
  • AMD FreeSync up to 75Hz
  • plenty of gaming features
  • vibrant colors
  • crisp image quality

Cons:

  • basic feature set
  • no VESA mount capability
  • no USB port
  • tilt only design
  • middling color and grayscale performance

4. Sceptre C248W 24-inch

There’s a lot we like about the Sceptre C248W including its good image quality, impressive grayscale performance and did we mention a curved 24-inch form factor at a reasonable price?

This feature usually makes for expensive monitors. The C248W features an 1800R curvature, a FHD (1920×1080) resolution and a 16:9 aspect ratio which means it doesn’t struggle to display 1080p video. It also impresses with a 5ms response time, a 3,000:1 contrast ratio with 250 nits of brightness.

With a 75Hz refresh rate, the monitor is good for day-to-day use. And while not quite up to the standard of gaming monitors, you can do some casual gaming.

The VA panel technology produces vibrant colors and good viewing angles (but not the best). It does a good job of keeping up with fast-moving items, but there is some lag in modern games at high resolution – input lag is 13.7 milliseconds.

The ultra-slim bezels and silver cabinet makes the monitor look even more expensive than it is. The cabinet is supported by a stand consisting of a circular-shaped base and a cylindrical arm. But adjustments are limited to tilting. On the back are four VESA mount holes if you’d prefer to hang the monitor.

You get five small function buttons on the back to navigate the on-screen menu. Although you don’t get advanced six-color adjustments, you do get an excellent selection of picture settings.

At the rear of the C248W facing the back are an HDMI port, VGA, a headphone jack and a DC connector.

Pros:

  • stylish no-bezel design
  • solid color and grayscale performance
  • VESA mount capability
  • low input lag
  • 75Hz refresh rate
  • high contrast ratio
  • decent image quality
  • FreeSync/G-Sync compatible

Cons:

  • viewing angles could be better
  • no ergonomic adjustments
  • moderate ghosting in fast-paced games
  • poor factory calibration
  • prone to blurring
  • slightly high input lag

5. Philips 276E9QDSB 27-inch

The Philips 276E9QDSB from the brand’s E line of value monitors offers a large IPS screen with vibrant colors. Image quality makes it not only suitable for daily use, but casual gaming too.

The 27-inch IPS panel has 1920×1080 resolution, a 60Hz refresh rate and 5ms response time. The WLED backlight has a maximum brightness of up to 325 nits. Static contrast is 1000:1.

Due to the size of the monitor, at 1080p there is some pixelation. Images aren’t as crisp as they would be on a smaller monitor. But the screen is extra vibrant with clear definition between shades. Just don’t try to use it for jobs that require precision like photo editing; graphic designers should also look elsewhere. Despite the IPS panel, motion blur is 10ms. And it’s compatible with FreeSync.

It’s more stylish than most competitors with a simplified aesthetic. The chassis is finished in a gloss black that might prove difficult to maintain. The screen features ultra-narrow borders making the viewing area look larger than it is. Despite a slightly curved bulge, the 276E9QDSB is thin.

The silver finished stand only offers tilt adjustment. But you get 100×100 VESA compatibility so you can hang it on your wall if you desire more adjustment. Build quality is quite good and the monitor doesn’t wobble.

The I/O panel is limited to just what’s essential for 1080p and 60Hz operation. You get an HDMI 1.4 slot, DVI-D Dual Link and a D-Sub for video inputs.

Pros:

  • lightweight
  • very stylish
  • IPS technology
  • FreeSync

Cons:

  • limited ergonomic options
  • no built-in speakers
  • no USB ports
  • minor ghosting in fast-paced gaming (mostly in dark scenes)

6. Sceptre E205W 20-inch

The Sceptre E205W is a 20-inch monitor with vivid colors, good contrast and a good deal.

The 20-inch LED-lit panel resolves the viewing angle issues of the 2017 iteration. What you get are better colors and of course, wide viewing angles with minimal color shifting. Part of the cost cutting measures is that you get an HD+ (1600×900) resolution rather than Full HD.

Color accuracy is good, but not the best. Still, you get rich, well-saturated colors. And while the grayscale is good, it doesn’t match the performance you get with an IPS panel.

The E205W shares the same design as Scepter’s other E-series models. The 20-inch display is couched inside a glossy black cabinet with a black curved stand for support. It’s a design that will fit on most home and office desks.

The stand allows for back-and-forth tilt adjustment. But lacks the ability for height, pivot or swivel adjustments. In back are VESA mounting holes if you want to hook it to a wall.

Picture settings are basic and include Brightness, Contrast and Blue Light adjustments. Along with the usual analog (Position, Focus and Clock) settings.

Connecting the E205W monitor to your laptop is easy with the HDMI and VGA ports. Just connect the power adapter and the monitor will power on. Then Windows installs all the necessary drivers.

Once installed you’ll find it listed in your Graphics control panel as an extended display. You can also choose to have it be your primary display or let it mirror your original display.

Pros:

  • attractive design
  • solid color output
  • energy efficient
  • good pixel density
  • AMD FreeSync up to 75Hz
  • built-in speakers
  • VESA mount compatibility

Cons:

  • stand isn’t fully adjustable
  • lacks USB port and DisplayPort input
  • inferior image quality compared to IPS and VA panels
  • lower than 1080p resolution
  • average brightness

7. Acer R240HY 24-inch

The Acer R240HY is a 24-inch midrange monitor with good looks. And it claims an IPS panel without drawing that much power, which is a good reason to check it out. It’s a good choice if you’re looking for a fairly stylish yet affordable 24-inch monitor with IPS.

The 1920×1080 resolution panel has a non-reflective coating along with a peak brightness of 250 nits. Out of the box, color accuracy is good, but not ideal. But here too you get rich, well-saturated colors.

Gray-scale performance is also good. But you don’t get the same level of highlight and shadow as you do with a high-end IPS panel. Viewing angles, however, are excellent with no color shifting or loss of luminance from any angle. The 4ms pixel response does a good job of following fast moving images.

It features a sleek bezel-free design with a glossy black cabinet that’s only half an inch thick at its thinnest point. The monitor is supported by a matching ring-shaped base that provides 20 degrees of tilt adjustability. But there’s no adjustment for height, pivot or swivel. It also lacks VESA-mounting capabilities.

Along the bottom edge of the panel is a strip of glossy-black trim holding five function buttons and a Power switch. Picture settings are basic including Brightness, Contrast and Blue Light adjustment.

There are also analog (Position, Focus and Clock) settings. Picture presets includes User, ECO, Standard, Graphics and Movie modes.

Around back are HDM, DVI and a VGA ports, as well as a headphone jack.

Pros:

  • good color and gray-scale performance
  • low input lag
  • energy efficient
  • thin bezels
  • vibrant and crisp colors
  • excellent viewing angles
  • 1080p performance

Cons:

  • tilt-only stand
  • no DisplayPort input
  • lacks USB ports
  • lacking VESA mounts
  • no AMD FreeSync
  • no built-in speakers
Our Top Pick
BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black
BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black
Our Top Pick
BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black
BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black

Last update on 2022-06-27 at 07:36 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Best Monitor under 150 Dollars Buying Guide

Everyone know how important choosing the most powerful laptop you can afford is to the success of any computing task. But often times, the importance of the monitor gets overshadowed. This guide covers all of the most important information you need to buy the best monitor under 150 dollars.

Screen Size

This relates to the size of the monitor. 24-inches is the average size of a monitor screen. So, it’s super easy to find a 24-inch monitor under $150. But if you’re looking for something else, you’ll be happy to know that most monitors in this price range feature a 21- to 25-inch screen sizes.

Screen Resolution

A monitor’s resolution tells you how many pixels the screen can display, measured horizontally x vertically. For example, 1920×1080. This means that the monitor can display 1,920 horizontally and 1080 pixels vertically.

Since most monitors under 150 dollars have a 21- to 25-inch display, 1080p Full HD resolution is the best resolution. However, on monitor screens bigger than 25-inches, things can look a bit pixelated.

Refresh Rate

The higher the refresh rate, the smoother your gameplay will be. A higher refresh rate is paramount for reducing motion blur when gaming. That means the low refresh rate of monitors in this price range don’t make them the best candidates for high-end gaming with heavy graphics.

A monitor’s refresh rate tells you how many times the screen can update an image per second.

Gaming displays are equipped with VRR (Variable Refresh Rate). This technology corrects issues like screen “tearing,” which is when the image on the screen becomes distorted, creating a distracting experience. NVIDIA was the first to address this issue with G-SYNC followed by AMD with FreeSync. Both technologies provide support for variable refresh rate.

Response Time

Close only counts in horseshoes and hand grenades (and pregnancy tests). Every millisecond counts, especially when gaming.

While a monitor with a 1 millisecond response time is common these days, the best gaming monitors under $150 will have a 5ms response time. The lower the response time the better, especially when it comes to competitive gaming where you want to detect fast moving objects as quickly as possible.

Display Technology

These are the three main panel types you’ll find while shopping for monitors in any price range: TN (Twisted Nematic), VA (Vertical Alignment) and IPS (In-Plane Switching).

Panel type determines the ability of the monitor. Let’s go through them for some detail.

TN Panel

Since they have the fastest refresh rate of all panel types, TN monitors are among the best choice for gaming. The biggest disadvantage is poor color reproduction, especially when viewing the monitor off center. But if you’re a fledgling gamer on a tight budget, this is a stalwart monitor for the money.

You can get up to 240 FPS with support from a capable graphics card. 240Hz equals a smooth gaming experience for titles like Overwatch. But lack of color accuracy makes this panel type problematic for other activities, including professional-level gaming.

VA Panel

Monitors with a VA panel offer better color quality, higher contrast levels, a satisfactory refresh rate, wider viewing angles and image depth than TN panels. But the slow response time make them perfect for gaming.

IPS Panel

IPS monitors have the best viewing angles and they’re the best choice if consistency and color accuracy is important to you. Most monitors under $150 offer a mostly IPS technology.

The IPS panel was designed to solve the issues with TN and VA panels. They offer the very best viewing angles and render the most accurate colors. That’s why they’re considered the second-best option for gamers (the slow response time might make you reconsider).

But paired with the right adaptive synch and graphics card, it offers the most exciting visual experience. And for activities like photo and video editing, this is the panel type you want.

Eye Strain

Whether you’re gaming or studying large data sets for hours on end, you want to protect your eyes. Look for monitors that offer low Blue Light or Flicker-Free technology. Check out our top picks of the best monitors to reduce eye strain.

Ergonomics

You want to prioritize monitors with an ergonomic advantage. The right monitor will align your eyes with everything you need to see on the monitor that way you can reduce neck strain and other physiological issues associated with starring at a monitor for hours.

Ultrawide Monitors

These monitors are capable of stretching out and giving you an immersive experience. They eliminate the need to buy more than one monitor. And they’re great for work and play.

Curved Monitors

By virtue of having a curved form-factor, these types of monitors offer more screen space than a regular flat monitor. By providing more screen space, curved monitors also eliminate the need for multiple displays. And they provide the ultimate immersive experience.

HDR

This monitor type is known to improve color contrast and represent realistic images – in other words you can be sure that what you’re seeing on the monitor looks exactly the way it should. They’re excellent for activities like photo and video editing where detail is important for delivering a jaw-dropping product.

Touchscreen

This technology makes using a monitor highly intuitive. It has educational as well as commercial benefits. A touch-sensitive monitor, however, might require some additional hardware and software to get everything set up to taste. But the end result often makes the effort well worth it.

FAQ

TN vs IPS Panels, which is best?

TN panels focus on speed and budget. They also have a lower latency than IPS panels, which is important for activities like gaming and they’re cheaper than IPS monitors. But this means that color reproduction suffers.

 Monitors with IPS technology deliver a better image quality along with wider viewing angles. But they’re among the most expensive displays. In the final analysis, it’s not so much about which is best as what’s most important to you as a user.

If you just want a cheap monitor (especially for gaming), go with a TN panel. If you do activities like photo and video editing where color accuracy is important, IPS monitors are the way to go.

What’s the difference between HDMI and VGA ports?

Both ports are necessary for connecting a monitor to your laptop. While VGA ports can only carry video signals, HDMI ports can be found on LED devices like monitors. It has the amazing ability to carry both visual and audio signals.

What’s the best resolution for PC gaming?

Full HD (1920×1080). We would recommend 4K, but there’s just not enough 4K gaming content out there yet to make the acquisition worth your while. But FHD delivers enough screen candy to satisfy your lust for scintillating gaming visuals.

BenQ 24 Inch IPS Monitor | 1080P | Proprietary Eye-Care Tech | Ultra-Slim Bezel | Adaptive Brightness for Image Quality | Speakers | GW2480 Black
  • 24 inch full HD 1080P IPS panel: 23. 8” full HD IPS widescreen with 1920x1080 resolution, 250 nits of brightness, built-in speakers
  • Wide viewing angle: 178° wide viewing angle for clarity from any viewing angle
  • Edge to edge slim bezel design: Ultra-slim bezel for virtually seamless multi-panel configurations for extended view, space-saving base, elegant design for home office
  • Patented Eye-Care for extended use: Proprietary brightness Intelligence Adaptive technology adjusts brightness for comfortable viewing, low blue light and zero-flicker technology prevent headaches and eye strain. This eye tech delivers optimized images that are easy on your eyes.
  • Integrated cable management system: neatly hides cables inside monitor stand; VESA wall mount: 100 x 100 (millimeter)

Last update on 2022-06-27 at 07:36 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API

Wrapping Up

1920x1080p resolution is fast becoming the industry standard for budget monitors. Whether you want a monitor for graphic design, website programing, gaming or just streaming movies, you can get a great monitor for just 150 dollars. Our top choice is the BenQ GW2480. While its beyond the scope of our $150 price point, the 250 nits of brightness, 60Hz refresh rate and 5ms response time are worth checking out. Next up is the Sceptre E248W offering solid performance for basic, everyday tasks. And finally, is the Acer SB220Q, the perfect choice at 21.5-inches when you want something with a smaller footprint.